Video instructions and help with filling out and completing Eagle Scout Rank Application

Instructions and Help about Eagle Scout Rank Application

So in this presentation we're going to talk about the Eagle Scout rank application process and then we'll also have a little bit of a discussion about how Eagle Scout references are administered sounds like fun you don't get out much do you to begin with we're going to talk about what happens before the Eagle Board of Review first the Scout must complete all the requirements he then prepares the Eagle Scout service project what but then the application for Eagle is completed all the required signatures are obtained then the applications submitted to the council service center for verification and once verified the board of review is scheduled and then the references are contacted and the board of review is held now let's look at the way that process works in a little more detail now here's a list of things to consider when filling out the application it's something that are commonly called red flag items the first are dates make sure that the birthday first class through life boards review all Mara badges all position of responsibility dates are all correct and complete on the form the next red flag is signatures make sure that the applicant has signed the form as well as the unit leader and the unit committee chair make sure the references are listed there are five if the Scout is not currently employed it's not affiliated with an organized religion then the parent or guardian provides this reference the 21 merit badge is being used for the rank of Eagle must be listed along with the date on which each was earned the position of responsibility must be one of those listed for Eagle Scout rank and must relate to the unit where the Scout is registered inactive and finally all the attachments the service project workbook the Scout statement of his life ambitions and life purpose and a listing of other positions honors and awards will be sent along with the packet okay so once all these issues are taken care of then the application is ready to send in right yeah that's right we want to copy the application all the attachments and we want to retain a copy of the application packet I've never had a Scout lose anything yeah it's pretty important paperwork and a lot of work has gone into creating the packets you do want to make sure to keep a copy and then you deliver the original promptly to the council service center it's best to deliver it by hand but if that's not practical it needs to go by certified mail is there any kind of rush on getting it up there well I wouldn't say you need to rush but timeliness is especially critical probably especially if the Scout is nearing his 18th birthday that's right and a lot of them are aren't they first of all the candidate shouldn't have to wait and if he's approaching or he has already

FAQ

When is the last possible date to submit an Eagle Scout rank application?
All Eagle Scout requirements must be completed before your 18th birthday, barring an exception for special needs. This includes “merit badges, service project, active participation, Scout spirit, position of responsibility, and unit leader conference.” Guide to Advancement 2015 section 9.0.1.1 [As of 11/6/16 the 2015 version is the most current.]However the signatures need not be dated before the Scout’s 18th birthday. (ibid, 9.0.1.3 #2, also 9.0.1.4) Section 9.0.1.5 mentions that a copy should be made of the application, service project workbook, etc. and once the copies are in safekeeping, the originals should be delivered promptly to the council service center. It says timeliness is especially critical if the candidate is approaching or has already turned 18.So clearly, although the work must be completed before the 18th birthday, the application needn’t be turned in by then. The Guide to Advancement recommends that the work be hand delivered if possible, but suggests registered or certified mail if that is not possible.“There is no requirement that the application must be completed or submitted before the 18th birthday. Councils do not have the authority to reject applications submitted on or after that date.” (Guide to Advancement section 9.0.1.5)The Board of Review will be scheduled after all records have been submitted to National and verified, then returned to the local council. No special permission is required for a Board of Review within 3 months after the 18th birthday (hence a good reason to submit your packet in a timely fashion).Between 3 and 6 months after the 18th birthday a letter of explanation for the delay is required, as is special permission from the local council. At 6 months past the 18th birthday or beyond, it becomes a real pain. Letters must be sent to National and permission granted to have a late Board of Review. Don’t be in this situation.Best bet, as everyone will tell you, is to get it all done as early as possible.
What kind of effect does being an Eagle Scout have on college applications?
Becoming an Eagle Scout does (usually) look great on an application, because it requires commitment, hard work, persistence, initiative in coming up with projects, and indicates a willingness to help others. Becoming an Eagle Scout is very difficult, and if you accomplish that while doing very well academically, then it’s a sign that you can handle a lot of work at once. I met three Eagle Scouts while at MIT. Outside of college, I knew one person who had managed to become an Eagle Scout, and that was my dad, who went to Dartmouth. I don’t remember meeting anyone at MIT who was a Boy Scout but hadn’t become an Eagle Scout (except for maybe a couple people who did like a year of Cubs when they were eight or whatever, which doesn’t really count.)My friends who were Eagle Scouts told me all about what it takes to achieve that, and it is not for the faint of heart. It therefore would undoubtedly look impressive on a college application to be an Eagle Scout. But my guess is that if you try to become an Eagle Scout solely for the purpose of making your college application look better, then you are unlikely to succeed. It seems you need to show real leadership and dedication to being the best Scout you can be for the sake of others, and if that alone doesn't motivate you, then it will likely be very hard to push yourself to do it over the length of time it takes. Also, all the schools you mentioned like to interview students and get a personal take on their activities. If your only motivation for becoming an Eagle Scout is to get into college, then that is likely to be apparent in an interview. And that certainly won’t help your application - top-tier universities like the ones you mentioned want students to have drive and passion for the things that they do and not just do them as a stepping stone to get into college.
What percentage of Boy Scouts reach the Eagle Scout rank in Boy Scouts of America? How long does it take?
Of all Boy Scouts, only about 3–5% of them become Eagle Scouts.However, this includes all Boy Scouts, even those who dropped out after a few months or barely participate. For those who put forth the effort and truly desire the award, success rates are much higher.That doesn’t mean it’s easy. If it were, the numbers would be a lot higher than 3–5% and it wouldn’t be as respected as it is. A lot of time, energy, leadership, and sometimes blood sweat and tears are needed to get there.As for the timing, it really does depend. I was in Scouts for a decade (including Cub Scouts) and earned my Eagle award late, six days before my 18th birthday. The earliest you could technically do it is around 12 or 13, assuming you started at 10 and really just did it all in a whirlwind. Most take longer and earn it around 16 or 17, and sometimes at 18 (there are limits to that). In my opinion, as a scout you shouldn’t focus everything on Eagle. Start your required badges early and always be planning for it, but take the opportunity to enjoy the program. Go to Philmont, volunteer, go on bike rides and hikes and everything else. You will develop leadership skills and personal growth that you didn’t think possible, and that will make your Eagle award all the more rewarding. Despite all of the blisters and cuts, the long miles and cold nights and sunburns and bug bites and sometimes worse, scouting is a truly transformative experience. Enjoy the journey. If I had to do my ten years of scouting again, I would in a heartbeat.
How many Eagle Scout ranks are awarded a year?
It varies every year, but the number quoted is 5% of all Scouts. In 2018 there were 52,160 newly minted Eagles. More information can be found here: Eagle Scout Class of 2018: A comprehensive look at the numbers
How has achieving the rank of Eagle Scout changed your life?
It’s made an impression on several people in my life that I have met. Its given me better peers in my Scout Troop whom I’ve continued to help ever since I aged out and got Eagle. I wanted to give back to the Troop so I became a merit badge counselor for my occupation, and organized a few campouts for them. My family, inner and out, has recognized it, and is proud of me for it. A College head told me that he puts anyone with that achievement at the top of his résumé stack of applicants that request to join his university.Personally, the resume thing was what really got me going in the beginning when my scoutmaster made a campfire story out of that fact. And it added to my leadership credential. But the real lesson I got out of my Eagle project/rank was this role in leadership:It's not all about ruling with an iron fist or a set plan, but gathering people for a cause.I anticipated over the course of my Eagle project to tell everybody what to do, but with their expertise and handling skills I didn't need to do much of anything but write down what was going to happen and what was needed. It took some time and hard work to organize, but it was worth it.It shows to everyone that you wanted to achieve something great at a young age. And that you were willing to work hard for it. The rank you have to want to achieve it. You cannot just whizz through it. I had a friend that was constantly told by his mother and even his teacher to achieve the rank. But because he never wanted it, he never got it.It's of personal satisfaction to me as well that I am of less than about 5% of young men of every Scouting generation to get the rank. Multiple people of my generation may go on later in life and regret it, I never will, as I will always be of that exclusive club. Once and Eagle, always an Eagle.
How much does attaining the rank of Eagle Scout affect your life?
It has a two-fold impact I believe. I built up a lot of self-confidence as a 15 year old by attaining something that takes a lot of work and dedication. I knew that if I persevered and worked hard I could do anything. The other big impact is how society perceived me. I was not just another kid but a kid who had gotten his Eagle Scout. Adults put more trust in me than other kids my age.Attaining Eagle Scout is like getting a college degree or successfully serving in the armed services, it’s a marker that society uses to vet an individual as someone who is able to learn, possesses inner discipline, and is honest in nature.To this day if I meet someone and they mention they were an Eagle Scout I put more stock into them as a person but generally if I have spent any time with them I will already have a suspicion that they are Eagle Scouts. It shows.
How many African boy scouts reach the Eagle rank?
None. Eagle Scout is the highest attainable rank only in the Boy Scouts of America, and the scouting program of the Philippines. The highest rank in other countries varies but is often something like "King's Scout".
When you complete the Eagle Scout rank in Boy Scouts, do you really have to join the army?
Could you tell me exactly which publication you are referring to as “the Scout manual,” and on what page does it say that Eagle Scouts must join the Army?For some reason, many people have a common misconception that the Boy Scouts of America is some how affiliated with the United States Army. Maybe it’s because the BSA has its units organized into troops and patrols with patrol leaders and a senior patrol leader similar to the Army’s divisions and platoons with platoon leaders and commanders. Maybe it is because Boy Scouts go on monthly camp outs, sort of like the National Guard has monthly weekend training. Or maybe it is because Boy Scouts serve the communities in which they live, like the military protects our communities. If so, that is about where the similarities end. There is no connection between the Boy Scouts of America and the US Army. The BSA is not a training ground for the Army. The organizations you are thinking of are ROTC in many colleges and Jr. ROTC in many high schools. These organizations ARE directly connected to the US Army and ARE training young people for service in the military.I have been involved with the Boy Scouts of America since my youth in the mid-1970s up to today. I have read through several Boy Scout Handbooks, which the boys use to keep track of their rank advancements and troop activities, and other BSA publications. No where does it say that anyone who earns any rank, let alone Eagle Scout, must join the Army.I have never witnessed anyone from any branch of the US military come to a troop meeting or Scouting activity to recruite any Scouts for military service. Any boys who have joined the military came to the decision on their own without any influence from any military personnel. There is absolutely no connection between the Boy Scout of America and the US Army.I am sorry to hear you decided to pull your sons out of Boy Scouts because of some misinformation. Did you ask your sons’ troop leaders or your local council about your concerns before you pulled them out of Scouting? If you had, you would have learned that your concerns were unfounded. Your boys have missed out on an excellent learning opportunity that teaches young people valuable life skills, leadership skills, citizenship, emergency preparedness, environmental preservation, survival skills and much more. If your sons are still old enough to be in Boy Scouts, I hope you reconsider you decision to pull them out.
Is it worth going through Boy Scouts to achieve the rank Eagle Scout?
I’m inclined to say “No.” If your only — or even major — reason for “going through” Boy Scouts is to reach Eagle, you’d be wasting your time and effort. Participating in Boy Scouts is a journey that provides a path through adolescence to adulthood. Everything along the way is part of the adventure. Eagle Scout is but a very worthwhile target and an accomplishment in which one can always take pride.Every step along the way — memorizing and taking the Scout Oath, learning the Scout Law, learning first aid and knots and how to build a fire and cooking and … the list goes on and on — is what makes the journey worthwhile. If you just “go through” it, you haven’t become a Boy Scout at heart.Now, if you are a Boy Scout at heart, I highly recommend striving for your Eagle! And don’t take any short cuts along the way. If some merit badge counselor signs off on a requirement when you don’t feel you have really earned it, work on that requirement until you are satisfied that you have really passed it. That is what makes any of the badges worthwhile!The rank of Eagle Scout is recognized as a superior achievement. Only a few percent of all Scouts have the persistence and determination to get there. It will probably never make a difference in a paycheck, but having it on your resume may be the difference that gets you a job.I earned mine 61 years ago, and I’m still so proud of it that it’s the first thing in my one-line Quora profile!By the way, Eagle Scout need not be the end of the road, either: I enjoyed being a Cubmaster and a Scoutmaster as much as I did being a Cub Scout, Boy Scout, and Explorer Scout.